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Nicholls students and faculty discuss their phobias

In light of a new semester being scary for many first-time freshman, students and faculty at Nicholls shared some of their phobias.

Caleb Guidry, English senior from Chackbay, said he is “absolutely frightened” of artificial intelligence. Chad Ingram, culinary senior from Hahnville, said he has “equal parts infatuation and fear of girls.” AJ Dayon, culinary senior from Opelousas, shared a few of his phobias that other students at Nicholls might have as well.

“Fear of heights is one,” Dayon said. “The fear of failure is my ultimate fear.”

Other students like Morgan Soileau, pre-med freshman from Larose, have phobias that might seem a little strange. Soileau said her fear of buttons started at a young age.

“My mom says that she first noticed it on the first day of pre-k,” Soileau said. “She tried to put a button-down shirt on me and I actually started gagging. Ever since then, I can remember I refused to wear buttoned clothing. Public school was hell. I never ate at school because having all those polo shirts around me was too overwhelming.”

Soileau said she feels uncomfortable just thinking about buttons.

“When I accidentally touch one, I have to put on some germ-x immediately,” Soileau said. “Metal buttons are okay like the ones you see on jeans but the worst ones are the ones with the brown swirl.”

Linda Martin, assistant professor of mass communication, also shared her phobia.

“A few years ago I was teaching speech at another university. For a demonstration presentation, a young man, a wildlife management major, took a large cooler to the podium. He then proceeded to take a 3-foot, living alligator from the cooler and invited the front-row students to touch it,” Martin said. “I guess my phobia would be apex predator visual aids.”

Some people said they had no phobias at all. Jay Udall, professor of English, can be considered one of those people.

“My only weird phobia is being asked what my weird phobias are,” Udall said.

Other people that didn’t necessarily have phobias still had things that troubled them. Kenneth Klaus, professor of music and choral activities, explained what bothers him since he doesn’t have a typical phobia like that of spiders or snakes.

“It bothers me a little when people say, “no problem” when the more correct, polite and formal response should be “you’re welcome” or “you are welcome,” Klaus said.

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The student newspaper of Nicholls State University
Nicholls students and faculty discuss their phobias