the nicholls worth

Cell phone usage could be a distraction to students

Shelby+Basle%2C+a+freshman+majoring+in+biology+pre-vetenarian+from+Chauvin%2C+playing+on+her+phone+in+the+Grid%2C+which+is+located+in+the+student+union%2C+on+a+Wednesday+afternoon.
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Cell phone usage could be a distraction to students

Shelby Basle, a freshman majoring in biology pre-vetenarian from Chauvin, playing on her phone in the Grid, which is located in the student union, on a Wednesday afternoon.

Shelby Basle, a freshman majoring in biology pre-vetenarian from Chauvin, playing on her phone in the Grid, which is located in the student union, on a Wednesday afternoon.

Photo by: Toni Kilbert

Shelby Basle, a freshman majoring in biology pre-vetenarian from Chauvin, playing on her phone in the Grid, which is located in the student union, on a Wednesday afternoon.

Photo by: Toni Kilbert

Photo by: Toni Kilbert

Shelby Basle, a freshman majoring in biology pre-vetenarian from Chauvin, playing on her phone in the Grid, which is located in the student union, on a Wednesday afternoon.

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In today’s society, we bring our cell phones everywhere we go and do not hesitate to use them at any time throughout the day.

One of the most common forms of communication is texting and email— cell phones make both quick and easy to access. They have become part of our every day lives by letting our families know how our day is going, documenting our lunches, or browsing social media in between classes. However, at some point, there comes a time when cell phones need to be put away in order for students to be able to concentrate on their classes and homework. Researchers from the Health and Human Services at Kent State University surveyed more than 500 college students about cell phone usage compared to their overall grade point average.

The study used undergraduates equally distributed by class and major. The students gave their cumulative college GPA and information about how much time they spend on their cell phones during and outside of class.

Their study proved cell phone use is negatively linked to GPA. The higher the cell phone use, the lower the GPA. This information did not surprise students at Nicholls State University, and it will not stop them from using their cell phones on a regular basis.

“I definitely get distracted by my cellphone,” Kristen Ahern, general studies major, said. “Sometimes I can’t focus on my homework because I’m too wrapped up in social media, but there comes a certain point when I tell myself I have to put it down in order to get stuff done.”

Just because the majority of students have issues controlling how often they are on their phones does not mean that every one is being affected negatively by their technology.

“I use my cell phone to help me with my homework,” Cody Morales, Petroleum Engineering Technology and Safety Management major, said. “If I need help on a problem, I can just look it up on my phone.”

Some students use different strategies in order to get their homework done, like studying and paying attention in class.

“When it comes to cell phones and class, I feel I have enough self-discipline to put mine away,” Marcus Fox, business marketing major, said.

Fox feels that in this day and age the majority of students are addicted to their cell phones or would find it extremely difficult to live a day without it.

“Needless to say, homework gets done much quicker without any distractions— social media and cell phones are the number one temptation,” Fox said.

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The student newspaper of Nicholls State University
Cell phone usage could be a distraction to students